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Establishing appliance and equipment standards

NEEA and its utility partners leverage the market power of the Northwest’s 12 million energy consumers to accelerate the market adoption of more stringent appliance and equipment standards at a regional and national level. NEEA does this by collaborating with its regional partners to develop strategies for advancing higher standards for appliances and equipment. These strategies rely on NEEA’s ability to leverage the market power of the Northwest to influence national processes, and many times includes collecting and submitting technical data and recommendations on behalf of the Northwest to the U.S. Department of Energy throughout the various stages of a standard’s adoption process.

  • 80 PLUS Market Progress Evaluation Report #4
    6/11/2012 ENERGY STAR and 80 PLUS market share is currently at a strong 70 percent of commercial desktops. While most barriers (identified in the program logic model) no longer impede the adoption of energy-efficient power supplies, Navigant found that the incremental cost of 80 PLUS power supplies and the lack of customer awareness of power supply energy use remain as impediments to greater market transformation. Navigant further identifies the risk associated with the close relationship between 80 PLUS and ENERGY STAR. If ENERGY STAR’s market share drops when the new ENERGY STAR specifications go into effect later in 2012, it is unlikely that 80 PLUS market share will sustain itself at current levels. Navigant concludes that 80 PLUS has partially transformed the market for energy-efficient power supplies.
    PDF, 666.01 KB
  • Long-Term Monitoring and Tracking Report on 2010 Activities
    Market transformation initiatives, by their nature, create change over the long term. The Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance (NEEA) tracks the progress of its market transformation initiatives during their implementation phase through periodic Market Progress Assessment Reports (MPERs). However, because market diffusion often occurs after NEEA funding has ceased, NEEA also needs a mechanism for tracking ongoing market progress in the post-funding period so that it can verify key assumptions in its cost-effectiveness models. Of the five initiatives assessed in the 2010 long-term monitoring and tracking (LTMT), Building Operator Certification represents the greatest incremental savings at 1.5 average megawatts (aMW) in 2010. Residential Windows follows in second place with 0.8 aMW. Drive Power reports 0.5 aMW of incremental savings, while SAV-AIR resulted in 0.1 aMW. BacGen created no incremental energy savings. The five initiatives resulted in 2010 incremental savings (due to new activity occurring in 2010) of 2.9 aMW.
    PDF, 2.04 MB
  • Long-Term Monitoring and Tracking Report on 2009 Activities
    Market transformation initiatives are long-term in nature. The development and launching of new products and services can be visualized as an “S”-shaped diffusion curve with relatively little market impact in the initial years and the major market effects occurring several years after an initiative is launched. The Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance (NEEA) tracks the progress of its market transformation initiatives during their implementation phase through periodic Market Progress Evaluation Reports (MPERs). However, since market diffusion often occurs after NEEA funding has ceased, NEEA also needs a mechanism for tracking ongoing market progress in the post-funding period so that it can verify key assumptions in its cost effectiveness models.
    PDF, 1.97 MB

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NEEA Team Lead

Charlie Stephens

Initiative Manager